What to do if Your Child has Bipolar Disorder

So you’ve discussed your child’s symptoms with a pediatric mental health specialist, and have a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. What now? Thankfully, there are some suggestions you can take, and taking care of your child with bipolar disorder is similar to taking care of an adult with the disorder.

1. Pay attention to medications and therapy appointments

As a parent, you are responsible for making sure your child follows their treatment plan. Use whatever reminders you can to remember to give him or her the medication that he or she needs.  If your child must take their pills at school, then open a line of communication with his or her teachers and school nurse. Appointments with his or her therapist are also important. Make sure your child attends their appointments

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Credit to flickr.com user Cristyan González Alfonso. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

2. Monitor side effects

Some side effects of atypical antipsychotics, like weight gain and blood sugar changes, are awful in adults–and children do seem to be more prone to them. These drugs were originally formulated for adults, and few have been tested on kids. Ask your child’s psychiatrist what side effects you need to keep an eye on.

3. Work out agreements with your child’s teachers

Some children with bipolar disorder need more help at school, such as more breaks during manic episodes, or less homework. During especially bad episodes, your child may need to be removed from school until he or she stabilizes. Talk to your child’s teachers. Keeping an open line of communication is the best way to ensure your child has success at school.

4. Keep a schedule

Try to be consistent with mealtimes and bedtimes, as well as waking your child up at the same time every day. This will help keep stress in the home to a minimum. Try to be patient with your child as they adjust to new routines.

5. Go to family therapy, if needed

Taking care of a child with bipolar disorder may put a lot of stress on the family as a whole. Your marriage might suffer, and the child’s siblings might be jealous of all the attention he or she gets. Attending therapy as a family may help you handle these issues.

6. Don’t ignore threats of suicide

Suicide threats are extremely serious, even in young children who may not understand what it means. Talk to your children, and if they do have suicidal ideation, give them a safe environment. Remove all the weapons or pills from the house. And talk with their mental health specialists. Crisis lines are always open.

7. Communicate with your teenager

Teenagers may become irritated or resentful if they feel that you’re compelling them to be treated. Talk to them about why you’re giving them medication and taking them to therapy appointments. Educate your kids about their mental illness. Also, it’s important that your teenager avoid substance abuse, as the risks of developing a problem are much higher in teens with bipolar disorder. Alcohol and drugs can interact with medications poorly and worsen mood episodes, so it’s important that your teenager be made aware of the risks.

All in all, taking care of your child with bipolar disorder requires an extra level of parenting. But you can do it. There are steps you can take to help you.

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