Children at High Risk for Bipolar Disorder Genetically Vulnerable to Stress

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Credit to flickr.com user tanitta. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

Genetic alterations that regulate stress have been found in children at high risk for bipolar disorder, according to research done by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The study was published in Translational Psychiatry, a Nature Publishing Group journal.

 

Researchers have long known that children who experience stressors in their lives are more likely to develop bipolar disorder. Parents with bipolar may struggle with their disorders, thus placing stress on their children. But this study shows that children at a high risk for developing bipolar–due to having family members with a history of psychiatric illness–are genetically vulnerable to stress.

The scientists at UTHealth took blood samples from eighteen children, consisting of a set of bipolar patients, a set of apparently neurotypical patients with bipolar parents, and a set of neurotypical controls with parents that have no history of mental illness. The blood samples revealed that, compared with the control group, bipolar children and unaffected kids with bipolar parents have genetic alterations that regulate the response to stress.

So, children with bipolar parents are more vulnerable to stress, and when stressed, tend to develop the disorder. This may sound like bad news all around, but there is a positive approach to this study. Future research may reveal the effects of reducing stress, as well as whether medication might be able to reverse the genetic alterations in children before bipolar disorder matures.

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Author: Cassandra Stout

Hi! My name is Cassandra Stout, and I am a freelancer and memoirist who blogs at The Bipolar Parent (Cassandrastout.com/bpparent) and at the International Bipolar Foundation (IBPF.org). My current project is Committed, my upcoming memoir that depicts my time spent in a psych ward after a postpartum psychotic breakdown. I am a ten-year member of a five-person critique group called the Seattle Scribblers. It's nice to meet you!