Good, Good, Good, Good Nutrition!

Anyone who has seen the documentary Super Size Me knows that Morgan Spurlock, who deliberately ate the most unhealthy meals at McDonald’s for a month, plunged into a deep depression by the second week of filming. Our moods are lifted by healthy food and destroyed by processed junk.

While good nutrition is vital for everyone’s health, research shows that it is especially so to those of us with mood disorders. A 2012 review by the University of Washington revealed that poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle may be coupled with “increased severity of symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder or decreased level of functioning.” 

Unfortunately, psychiatric patients tend to have “many nutrient inadequacies … and occasional excesses,” which translates to both a lack of essential vitamins and minerals and too many fats–in numbers even worse than the neurotypical population. With regard to vitamins, a broad-spectrum pre-natal with folic acid is also a boon if you’re vitamin-deficient.  Omega-3 fatty acids (fish oils) have also shown promise in helping with depression, though the research is controversial.

However, please speak to your doctor before making any changes. Maintaining a healthy diet is made even trickier due to mood episodes. According to the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, cutting fat out of your diet entirely can tip you into a manic or depressed state. Sugar is terrible for the bipolar-inclined, as it is linked with severe depression. Likewise, alcohol and caffeine should be avoided like the plague. As a contrast, lean proteins and fresh produce are wonderful, but expensive.  

A rough guideline for anyone with aneurotypical brain chemistry is to look for Zinc (red meat), B-vitamins (fish), and vitamin C (oranges).  Drinking as much water as you can is incredibly useful.  And you’ll need to pay even more attention to diet if you are pregnant, something that almost goes without saying.  

Anyone who plans to make dietary changes is advised to consult a nutritionist—provided they can afford one. I know it’s difficult to stick to changes regarding food or exercise plans, especially if you have to think about making healthy lunches for your children before school. But every little bit helps.

What healthy snack or activity have you found lifts your mood the best? What tends to lower it? Do you have a comfort food, and if so, what is it?

Not meant to take the place of a treatment plan created with licensed professionals.

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