The Bipolar Parent’s Saturday Morning Mental Health Check in: Sunshine Edition

Hello! Welcome to The Bipolar Parent’s Saturday Morning Mental Health Check in: Sunshine Edition! Thanks so much for dropping by. 

The Bipolar Parent's Saturday Morning Mental Health Check in: Sunshine Edition - CassandraStout.com

How are you? How’s the weather been? How are the kids? What have you been struggling with? Are you managing to perform self-care? Let me know in the comments!

First, I apologize that this post is so late. It’s more like a Saturday Afternoon Mental Health Check in, haha. I forgot to write the post yesterday (Friday), which is what I usually do.

When I signed on to my website this morning, I found it wasn’t working, so I needed to troubleshoot it. I was frantically working on that, and then my kids woke up and wanted to cuddle with me upstairs. I figured my kids are more important than a website (sorry!), and cuddled with them.

Then, at 10am, we had a toddler group (like a co-op preschool, but one day a week) class, as a make-up class for a snow day we’d had in December. I also forgot about that. So that’s why this post is so late.

My Week

My week has been a blend of ups and downs.

The sun finally came out this week, so I spent a lot of time just sitting in sun puddles and soaking it up, like my cat did. The therapy boxes and the higher dose of Wellbutrin, my antidepressant (plus an new anti-anxiety med) seem to be working. So I’ve had more good days than bad this week, a welcome change.

On Tuesday, I felt great, but stayed up until 2am working on my new fantasy story. I thought I would be tired the next day. But on Wednesday, I jumped out of bed at 7:30am, feeling great. I rode the high all day.

Thursday was objectively terrible. I woke up groggy and depressed and stayed that way until 4:30pm, when I finally mustered up the energy to get out of the house. I took Toddler in her stroller to a nearby coffee shop, and we had a mother-daughter date. That was nice.

On Friday, which was Valentine’s day, I felt great again, so I cleaned the house and made lasagna (my husband’s favorite meal, which was one of my presents to him).

Today, I feel great again. So this week has been excellent, and I think it’s because of all the sunshine we’ve been getting. There was no sun for all of January. It rained continuously every day. That was a dark time for me, both literally and metaphorically.

if you are bipolar (or even if you aren’t), I hope that you, too, have been conquering depression lately, or just haven’t had to deal with that part of the disease in a while. Thanks for listening.

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The Bipolar Parent's Saturday Morning Mental Health Check in: Sunshine Edition - CassandraStout.com

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Good, Good, Good Nutrition, Part II: Foods to Avoid When Managing Bipolar Disorder

We all know that an unhealthy diet can affect our bodies in negative ways. But did you know that some foods are especially bad for mental health? Studies show that the following foods are really, really bad for you if you have bipolar disorder, or suffer from depression.

Caffeine

Caffeine is a stimulant which can make you jittery and on edge, and cause you to miss out on sleep, which is crucial for managing your mood–and may tip you into mania if you don’t get enough sleep. If you’re trying to stop eating or drinking caffeine, make sure you wean yourself off of it gradually, as stopping abruptly can have adverse effects on your body.

Caffeine is found in the following:

  • coffee
  • soda
  • chocolate
  • tea
  • weight-loss pills
  • energy water
alcohol
Credit to flickr.com user Peter Anderson. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

Alcohol

Alcohol is a depressant, even though it can seem to raise your spirits (pun intended). Drinks can also lower inhibitions and increase impulsivity. In a recent study in the journal Addiction, researchers found that alcohol misuse doubled the risk of the development of major depressive disorder. Even for people who are not alcoholics, drinks may fuel suicidal ideation. As with caffeine, doctors recommend weaning yourself off alcohol gradually.

Tyramine

If you take monoamine oxidase inhibitors, like my dear friend Dyane Hardwood, then there are some dietary requirements you need to pay attention to. Most importantly, you need to avoid tyramine, which can cause the amino acid to spike, which increases blood pressure to dangerous levels. Tyramine is found in:

  • aged cheeses
  • cured, processed, and smoked meats
  • fermented foods such as sauerkraut and kimchi
  • soybeans
  • dried fruit

Nitrates

A recent study shows that nitrates, which are chemicals used to process and cure meats, can contribute to mania. They’ve also been linked to pancreatic cancer and Alzheimer’s disease, and children under six should avoid them in general.

Nitrates can be found in:

  • bacon
  • pepperoni
  • salami
  • hot dogs

Supplements

Supplements like St. John’s wort aren’t really food, but some of them can interact negatively with your bipolar medications, making them less effective, or spiking their levels. Talk to your doctor about what interactions occur with supplements and herbal therapies.

Sugar

In bipolar disorder patients especially, refined sugars can cause wild mood swings. Too much sugar can contribute to obesity, which makes some bipolar medications less effective, especially if the weight is gained around the middle. Instead, look to complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and vegetables.

All in all, diet is extremely important to mental health. If you stay on top of your food and supplement intake, you’ll be able to manage your brain’s ups and downs much more effectively.

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