How to Shield Your Children from the Effects of Your Bipolar Disorder

A version of this post appeared on the International Bipolar Foundation website.

As a parent with bipolar disorder, you might worry about the effects of your unchecked mental illness on your loved ones, especially your children. The devastating mood swings of bipolar disorder–ranging from manic “highs” to depressive “lows” and everything in between–can cause instability for your kids. One example, a 2014 study, showed teenaged children of parents with bipolar disorder are more susceptible to risky sexual behavior and emotional problems than young adults who do not have parents with bipolar disorder. As has been seen in many other cases, dysfunction in the home causes dysfunction in the child. This is equally true in cases of children with parents who suffer from mental illness, like bipolar disorder.

children
A picture of four cheerful kids with brown skin. Credit to flickr.com user Adam Lai. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

But there is good news. You can learn how to shield your children from the effects of your psychiatric condition. How? Let’s dig in.

Treat Your Disorder Properly

One of the most effective ways to shield your children from your bipolar disorder is to treat the disease properly. Try to eat a healthy diet and work exercise into your life. Adequate sleep is another requirement to keep you healthy and keep things from spiraling out of control. Make sure you get your forty winks, and if you have trouble, talk to your doctor. Taking medication regularly and working through emotional problems through therapy will help you manage your disorder and aid you in positively impacting your kids.

If your disorder is treatment-resistant, don’t give up hope. Dyane Harwood, author of Birth of a New Brain: Healing From Postpartum Bipolar Disorder, thought she’d exhausted all of her options to treat her bipolar depression, including electroconvulsive therapy. Then her doctor prescribed a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI). The drug worked, and Harwood is now engaged with her children and husband, living life the way she wants to.

Get Help

Bipolar in the family needs a whole family solution. The entire household needs to learn coping skills to handle a parent’s disorder. Ask your therapist for ways to teach your partner and children to deal with the ups and downs of your bipolar disorder. If your children start showing symptoms of emotional problems, such as anxiety, phobias, or intolerance to frustration, find a child behavioral psychologist or a therapist willing to see children. Make a list of the symptoms you’ve seen in your kids, and be sure to include your family history as well.

Cultivate a Support Network

One aspect of getting help is relying on a support system of healthy adults. They can spot you when you’re feeling too up or too down. They can offer your children a more stable environment during manic or depressive episodes by taking the children to a different place, like your friends’ homes, or coming over to yours. Your kids need adults they can consistently rely on, even if you can’t provide that reliability sometimes. Try to develop that support if you don’t have it. When you are well, cultivate reciprocal friendships with other adults you can trust with your children. Easier said than done, of course, but try to be a reliable source of childcare for your parent friends, so they will pitch in when you need them.

Prepare Your Kids

Shielding your kids from bipolar disorder doesn’t mean hiding the illness from them. Preparing your children to accept what’s happening around them can be difficult, but it is worthwhile. Communication with your children is crucial when managing their understanding of bipolar disorder. You might think explaining your disease to them is wrong. There’s an instinct to hide uncomfortable situations from your children, but kids are intuitive. They will know if someone in the family is suffering, even if they can’t put their finger on why. If the problem isn’t explained to them, they may assume the worst, even to the point where they think it’s their fault. Letting your children know up front what to expect if you’re suffering from a mood episode will help your kids roll with the punches. Keep the explanation simple, and be ready to revisit the conversation anytime your children have questions.

When explaining your bipolar disorder to your children, stress that this disease is not your kids’ fault. Also stress that taking care of a parent suffering from mental illness is not their job. They will probably appreciate your candor and feel more secure in their relationship with you and their place in the world. If things don’t go well, talk to your therapist for ways to help your children understand bipolar disorder and their relationship with you as a parent with a mental illness.

If your older children are concerned about developing bipolar disorder themselves, tell your preteens honestly that they are not destined to have the disease. Studies put the inheritance rate at about 30% with a single parent affected by bipolar disorder, and around 60% for both. You don’t need to quote the statistics to a younger child, but a teen might be interested. Because of the instinct to hide uncomfortable situations from your children, you might want to keep this from your children. But knowing even uncomfortable statistics, like the 30%, is better than the unknown.

Final Thoughts

When you suffer from mental illness, taking care of yourself is a tall order. Taking care of a child as a parent with bipolar disorder adds additional complications, but it’s worth it. You can shield your children from bipolar disorder in several ways. Make sure that you treat your disease with professional help. Cultivate a support system. And it’s paramount that you communicate with your children about your disorder, so they know what to expect and what their place is.

You can do this.

Show me some love!

How Specific Gene Variants May Raise Bipolar Disorder Risk

cpgv level
In this data visualization, each horizontal line is an individual. Those with bipolar disorder were more likely to be on the lower end of the CPG2 protein expression scale, and more likely to have gene variants that reduced expression. Credit: Rathje, Nedivi, et. al.

A new study by researchers at The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT finds that the protein CPG2 is significantly less abundant in the brains of people with bipolar disorder (BD) and shows how specific mutations in the SYNE1 gene that encodes the protein undermine its expression and its function in neurons.

Led by Elly Nedivi, professor in MIT’s departments of Biology and Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and former postdoc Mette Rathje, the study goes beyond merely reporting associations between genetic variations and psychiatric disease. Instead, the team’s analysis and experiments show how a set of genetic differences in patients with bipolar disorder can lead to specific physiological dysfunction for neural circuit connections, or synapses, in the brain.
The mechanistic detail and specificity of the findings provide new and potentially important information for developing novel treatment strategies and for improving diagnostics, Nedivi said.

“It’s a rare situation where people have been able to link mutations genetically associated with increased risk of a mental health disorder to the underlying cellular dysfunction,” said Nedivi, senior author of the study online in Molecular Psychiatry. “For bipolar disorder this might be the one and only.”

The researchers are not suggesting that the CPG2-related variations in SYNE1 are “the cause” of bipolar disorder, but rather that they likely contribute significantly to susceptibility to the disease. Notably, they found that sometimes combinations of the variants, rather than single genetic differences, were required for significant dysfunction to become apparent in laboratory models.

“Our data fit a genetic architecture of BD, likely involving clusters of both regulatory and protein-coding variants, whose combined contribution to phenotype is an important piece of a puzzle containing other risk and protective factors influencing BD susceptibility,” the authors wrote.

CPG2 in the Bipolar Brain

During years of fundamental studies of synapses, Nedivi discovered CPG2, a protein expressed in response to neural activity, that helps regulate the number of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate at excitatory synapses. Regulation of glutamate receptor numbers is a key mechanism for modulating the strength of connections in brain circuits. When genetic studies identified SYNE1 as a risk gene specific to bipolar disorder, Nedivi’s team recognized the opportunity to shed light into the cellular mechanisms of this devastating neuropsychiatric disorder typified by recurring episodes of mania and depression.

For the new study, Rathje led the charge to investigate how CPG2 may be different in people with the disease. To do that, she collected samples of postmortem brain tissue from six brain banks. The samples included tissue from people who had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, people who had neuropsychiatric disorders with comorbid symptoms such as depression or schizophrenia, and people who did not have any of those illnesses. Only in samples from people with bipolar disorder was CPG2 significantly lower. Other key synaptic proteins were not uniquely lower in bipolar patients.

“Our findings show a specific correlation between low CPG2 levels and incidence of BD that is not shared with schizophrenia or major depression patients,” the authors wrote.

From there they used deep-sequencing techniques on the same brain samples to look for genetic variations in the SYNE1 regions of BD patients with reduced CPG2 levels. They specifically looked at ones located in regions of the gene that could regulate expression of CPG2 and therefore its abundance.
Meanwhile, they also combed through genomic databases to identify genetic variants in regions of the gene that code CPG2. Those mutations could adversely affect how the protein is built and functions.

Examining Effects

The researchers then conducted a series of experiments to test the physiological consequences of both the regulatory and protein coding variants found in BD patients.

To test effects of non-coding variants on CPG2 expression, they cloned the CPG2 promoter regions from the human SYNE1 gene and attached them to a ‘reporter’ that would measure how effective they were in directing protein expression in cultured neurons. They then compared these to the same regions cloned from BD patients that contained specific variants individually or in combination. Some did not affect the neurons’ ability to express CPG2 but some did profoundly. In two cases, pairs of variants (but neither of them individually), also reduced CPG2 expression.

Previously Nedivi’s lab showed that human CPG2 can be used to replace rat CPG2 in culture neurons, and that it works the same way to regulate glutamate receptor levels. Using this assay they tested which of the coding variants might cause problems with CPG2’s cellular function. They found specific culprits that either reduced the ability of CPG2 to locate in the “spines” that house excitatory synapses or that decreased the proper cycling of glutamate receptors within synapses.

The findings show how genetic variations associated with BD disrupt the levels and function of a protein crucial to synaptic activity and therefore the health of neural connections. It remains to be shown how these cellular deficits manifest as biopolar disorder.

Nedivi’s lab plans further studies including assessing behavioral implications of difference-making variants in lab animals. Another is to take a deeper look at how variants affect glutamate receptor cycling and whether there are ways to fix it. Finally, she said, she wants to continue investigating human samples to gain a more comprehensive view of how specific combinations of CPG2-affecting variants relate to disease risk and manifestation.

Materials provided by Picower Institute at MIT.

Related:

Show me some love!

America Has Highest Rate of Bipolar Disorder Diagnoses in 11-Nation Study

Bipolar disorder, a disease characterized by “highs” (called mania) and “lows” (called depression), does not discriminate. It affects men and women equally, has been affecting children more and more, and appears to have a roughly similar incidence across all ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups. About 2.4% of people around the world are diagnosed with bipolar disorder in their lifetimes.

According to a new 11-nation study conducted by researchers around the world, the United States has the highest incidence of bipolar disorder, at 4.4%. India has the lowest rate at 0.1%, followed by Japan at 0.7%. Lower-income nations typically demonstrated lower rates. Colombia, a lower-income nation, bucked the trend with a incidence of 2.6%.

But why does the U.S. experience the highest bipolar rate among all 11 nations studied? Let’s dig in.

Wealth

Wealth may play a role. Individuals in higher-income nations were more likely to be diagnosed than those in lower-income nations. The exception is Japan, with an incidence rate of 0.7%.

Unfortunately, the U.S. also has the largest worldwide gap between the rich and the poor. The economic stressors are greater than in other Western societies. This means there are more psychological stressors among the poor of America, which may lead to substance abuse and fragmentation of the family.

Immigrant Melting Pot

Genetics may also contribute in the rate of bipolar disorder in different countries. Studies have confirmed that the condition sometimes runs in families, and that the lifetime chance of an identical twin of a bipolar twin developing the disorder is about 40% to 70%. So the genetic makeup of a country may affect the rate.

But what about immigrants? America is known as the “melting pot” of the world, due to all the immigrants that come here. Among people who have emigrated, the actual expression of bipolar disorder is the same as it is in the population that those people have left. However, what’s interesting to note is that, in those cases, their children tend to have higher rates of mental illnesses, including bipolar disorder, by a factor of as much as tenfold.

Social scientists suspect that the lack of extended family and cultural systems may result in higher incidences of bipolar disorder, as environmental stressors play a factor in the development of the disease. With a lack of familial support, immigrants have less of a buffer in terms of a social network, especially when they first arrive.

And immigrants seeking a new life in America might be more risk-taking than people who stay in their home countries. The immigrant belief that they can find success here takes a certain mindset of grandiosity and other symptoms of hypomania, which may be more common among people who suffer from bipolar disorder.

Stigma

map.jpg
A stylized map of South America. Credit to flickr.com user Stuart Rankin. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

Stigma also plays a part in the incidence rate of bipolar disorder among different countries. Fewer than half of those suffering from the disorder sought help for it. And only a quarter of those in low-income countries were treated by a mental health professional for bipolar disorder.

Some cultures are reluctant to talk about psychiatric things. Lower-income nations experience higher rates of stigma. Fewer people are willing to come forward with their struggle with mental illnesses, which leads to a lower perceived rate of bipolar disorder.

Cultural awareness of mental illnesses also contributes to the problem of stigma. Americans are fairly aware of bipolar disorder as a disease, whereas the symptoms of the condition may be missed or ignored in lower-income nations. This leads to lower rates of diagnosis.

The Bottom Line

No matter where people live, bipolar disorder causes serious impairment among those who suffer from it. People need to be less afraid about seeking help for their mental illnesses. Educating individuals about the disease may help combat stigma. Greater awareness among cultures will only help people get much-needed treatment.

Related:

Show me some love!

Brain Training Shows Promise For Patients With Bipolar Disorder

game
Credit to flickr.com user m kasahara Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

Researchers at McLean Hospital, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, have discovered for the first time that computerized brain training can result in improved cognitive skills in individuals with bipolar disorder.

In a paper published in the October 17, 2017, edition of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, the researchers suggest that brain exercises could be an effective non-pharmaceutical treatment for helping those with bipolar disorder function more effectively in everyday life.

“Problems with memory, executive function, and processing speed are common symptoms of bipolar disorder, and have a direct and negative impact on an individual’s daily functioning and overall quality of life,” said lead investigator Eve Lewandowski, PhD, director of clinical programming for one of McLean’s schizophrenia and bipolar disorder programs and an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. “Improving these cognitive dysfunctions is crucial to helping patients with bipolar disorder improve their ability to thrive in the community,” Lewandowski added.

Lewandowski and her colleagues knew from previous studies that this type of intervention had helped patients with schizophrenia improve cognitive functions. “There is considerable overlap in cognitive symptoms between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia,” Lewandowski noted.

The researchers therefore decided to test the impact of brain exercises in the bipolar population. They randomly assigned patients with bipolar disorder, aged 18-50, to either an intervention group or an active comparison group (used as a control). The intervention group was asked to use a special regimen of neuroplasticity-based exercises from Posit Science — maker of the BrainHQ online exercises and apps — for a total of 70 hours over the course of 24 weeks. These exercises use a “bottom-up” approach, targeting more basic cognitive processes early in the treatment to strengthen cognitive foundations, then moving on to training focused on more complex cognitive functions later in the program. The control group was asked to spend an equivalent amount of time on computerized exercises that focused on quiz-style games, like identifying locations on maps, solving basic math problems, or answering questions about popular culture.

At the end of the study, the participants in the intervention group displayed significant improvements in their overall cognitive performance as well as in specific domains, such as cognitive speed, visual learning, and memory. “The intervention group maintained cognitive improvements six months after the end of the treatment, and in some areas even showed continued improvements,” Lewandowski reported.

Lewandowski is encouraged by the findings, as they demonstrate that “this type of non-pharmaceutical intervention can significantly improve cognition in patients with bipolar disorder,” she said. “These findings suggest that once the brain is better able to perform cognitive tasks, it will continue to strengthen those processes even after patients stop using the treatment.” In addition, Lewandowski said, “The study indicates that affordable and easily accessible web-based interventions can be effective for a broad group of patients.”

Lewandowski noted that further research is needed to determine how the improvements in these cognitive skills impact work and leisure activities and daily functioning in patients with bipolar disorder.

Text provided by McLean Hospital.

Related:

Left-handed People Require Different Mental Health Treatments, Study Finds

According to a radical new model of emotion in the brain, a current treatment for the most common mental health problems could be ineffective or even detrimental to about 50 percent of the population.

Since the 1970s, hundreds of studies have suggested that each hemisphere of the brain is home to a specific type of emotion. The neural system for emotions linked to approaching and engaging with the world – like happiness, pride and anger – lives in the left side of the brain, while emotions associated with avoidance – like disgust and fear – are housed in the right.

But those studies were done almost exclusively on right-handed people. That simple fact has given us a skewed understanding of how emotion works in the brain, according to Daniel Casasanto, associate professor of human development and of psychology.

That long-standing model is, in fact, reversed in left-handed people, whose emotions like alertness and determination are housed in the right side of their brains, Casasanto suggests in a new study. Even more radical: The location of a person’s neural systems for emotion depends on whether they are left-handed, right-handed or somewhere in between, the research shows.

“The old model suggests that each hemisphere is specialized for one type of emotion, but that’s not true,” Casasanto said. “Approach emotions are smeared over both hemispheres according to the direction and degree of your handedness … . The big theoretical shift is, we’re saying emotion in the brain isn’t its own system. Emotion in the cerebral cortex is built upon neural systems for motor action.”

The study, “Approach motivation in human cerebral cortex,” appeared June 18 in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. The paper’s first author, Geoffrey Brookshire, was a doctoral candidate in Casasanto’s lab at the University of Chicago and a visiting doctoral student in Casasanto’s lab at Cornell.

The idea for the researchers’ theory, called the “sword and shield” hypothesis, stems from Casasanto’s observation that we use our dominant hands for approach-oriented actions, while nondominant hands are used for avoidance movements.

“You would wield the sword in your dominant hand to make approach-related actions like stabbing your enemy, and use the shield in your nondominant hand to fend off attack,” he said. “Your dominant hand gets the thing you want and your nondominant hand pushes away the thing you don’t.”

The researchers theorized that approach and avoidance emotions are built on neural systems for approach and avoidance actions.

“If this sword and shield hypothesis is correct,” he said, “then three things should follow: Approach motivation should be mediated by the left hemisphere in strong right-handers, as it has been in tons of previous studies. But it should completely reverse in strong left-handers. For everyone in the middle of the handedness spectrum, approach emotions should depend on both hemispheres.”

Casasanto and Brookshire tested this idea by stimulating the two hemispheres of the brains of 25 healthy participants with a pain-free electrical current. The goal was to see if they could cause the participants to experience approach-related emotions – including enthusiasm, interest, strength, excitement, determination and alertness – depending on which hemisphere of the brain was stimulated and whether they were righties or lefties or somewhere in between. The study participants got zapped for 20 minutes a day for five days, and reported before and after the five days how strongly they were feeling emotions like pride and happiness.

The experiment worked – and corroborated the researchers’ first test of the sword and shield hypothesis using brain imaging. Strong righties who were zapped in the left hemisphere experienced a boost in positive emotions. So did strong lefties zapped in the right hemisphere. But when lefties are zapped in the left hemisphere – or righties in the right – “you see either no change or a detriment in the experience of these emotions,” Casasanto said.

The work has implications for a current treatment for recalcitrant anxiety and depression called neural therapy. Similar to the technique used in the study and approved by the Food and Drug Administration, it involves a mild electrical stimulation or a magnetic stimulation to the left side of the brain, to encourage approach-related emotions.

But Casasanto’s work suggests the treatment could be damaging for left-handed patients. Stimulation on the left would decrease life-affirming approach emotions. “If you give left-handers the standard treatment, you’re probably going to make them worse,” Casasanto said.

“And because many people are neither strongly right- nor left-handed, the stimulation won’t make any difference for them, because their approach emotions are distributed across both hemispheres,” he said.

hand
Credit to flickr.com user spazbot29. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

“This suggests strong righties should get the normal treatment, but they make up only 50 percent of the population. Strong lefties should get the opposite treatment, and people in the middle shouldn’t get the treatment at all.”

However, Casasanto cautions that this research studied only healthy participants and more work is needed to extend these findings to a clinical setting.

Text provided by Cornell University.

Show me some love!

Brain Protein Targeted to Develop New Bipolar Disorder Therapies

protein
Credit to flickr.com user HealthMindandKat. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

A new study by scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has identified specific genetic variations closely associated with increased susceptibility to bipolar disorder and other conditions. The discovery may provide a target for new therapies.

 

In the new study, the researchers focused on a gene known as PDE10A, one of the many genes that has been linked to bipolar disorder, and the proteins this gene produces. These proteins help regulate intracellular levels of a messenger molecule called cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate), which is involved in a variety of biological processes including learning and memory.

“We began with the idea that behavioral changes in bipolar subjects might be due to these genetic variations in the cAMP messenger pathway,” said Ron Davis, chair of TSRI’s Department of Neuroscience. “We did find that this was the case and, indeed, that these variations were in one specific gene for the cAMP messenger pathway called PDE10A. The variations that we found in the gene may alter the function of one form of PDE10A and lead to susceptibility to bipolar disorder.”

The research, published recently by the journal Translational Psychiatry, examined human brain tissue from patients with bipolar disorder, as well as brain tissue from individuals without the psychiatric disorder.

“The PDE10A19 protein is interesting because we previously didn’t know it even existed in the human brain and because it’s found only in other primates—not mice or rats,” said Research Assistant Courtney MacMullen, the first author of the study. “Once we understand how this protein helps neurons remain healthy, we might be able to develop medications to treat neurons when they function abnormally, such as in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.”

The results suggested abnormal variations in PDE10A19 might alter cAMP signaling by interacting with another protein known as PDE10A2, restricting its activity and disrupting the entire process.

Davis said that the complexity of gene expression in the human brain is greatly underestimated, and that future neurogenetic studies ought to begin with a deep study of each gene’s ability to code for proteins to avoid false conclusions, particularly when it comes to the development of potential therapies.

“We need to know much more about this large family of enzymes and the roles they play in disorders like bipolar disorder,” he said.

Text taken from the Scripps Research Institute.

Show me some love!

Treatable Condition Could be Mistaken for Bipolar Disorder

antibodies
Credit to the NIH Image Gallery on flickr.com. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

Researchers at Houston Methodist will pioneered a new study that will hopefully show that a significant number of people may have a treatable immune system condition often mistaken for either bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. This study could impact millions of people.

“We suspect that a significant number of people believed to have schizophrenia or bipolar disorder actually have an immune system disorder that affects the brain’s receptors,” said Joseph Masdeu, M.D., Ph.D., the study’s principal investigator and a neurologist with the Houston Methodist Neurological Institute. “If true, those people have diseases that are completely reversible – they just need a proper diagnosis and treatment to help them return to normal lives.”

In 2007, scientists discovered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, a disease which can be treated with immunotherapy medications that causes symptoms similar to bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. The encephalitis forces the immune system to attack N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the brain instead of invading agents.

The NMDA receptors control decision-making, thoughts, and perceptions, which is why this illness is often mistaken for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. The encephalitis can also cause sufferers to hear voices or become paranoid.

The study will collect cerebral spinal fluid from 150 patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia and 50 healthy controls between the ages of 18 to 35. The fluid will be examined for antibodies attacking NMDA and other brain receptors. If abnormal antibodies are found, the researchers will notify the patient so he or she may consider treatment.

Masdeu plans to use the findings for development of further studies about antibodies.

Materials provided by Houston Methodist.

Show me some love!

Men and Women Differ When it Comes to Bipolar Biomarkers

protein
Credit to flickr.com user Healthmindandkat. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

According to a new study by an international team of researchers, men and women have different reactions to compounds associated with immune system response to bipolar disorder. This is exciting news! The findings mean that bipolar disorder can one day be diagnosed by biological measurements in the body, and that approaches to treatment can be tailored differently for the sexes.

 

Researchers have long known that bipolar disorder manifests differently in men and women. This suggests that different biological processes underlie the condition in the two sexes. Additionally, the immune system activates during periods of mania or depression, and previous studies have demonstrated that immune system activation starts low-level inflammatory process in the brain, which is harmful. This inflammation may contribute to poor function among bipolar sufferers.

The immune system works differently in men and women as well. Researchers decided to measure immune system factors in men and women with bipolar disorder to see if reliable markers for the diseases could be found.

Scientists measured concentrations of zinc and neopterin–both associated with inflammatory processes–in blood samples of both men and women experiencing manic or depressive episodes, as well as from healthy controls. Zinc is a mineral needed by a healthy immune system to function properly, while neopterin is an immune marker secreted by white blood cells when the immune system is activated.

The 27 people with bipolar disorder recruited for the study had lower levels of zinc in their blood than the 31 healthy controls. There was no difference in neopterin levels. However, when women had more zinc in their blood, their depression was worse, whereas men’s mania was worse if they had higher concentrations of neopterin.

Zinc deficiencies have been associated with depression in the past, so the findings were surprising. Scientists are now measuring zinc levels in the brains of mice with inflammatory depression to see if higher levels of zinc in the blood means less in the brain.

The findings do not suggest that people suffering depression should take zinc, however.

What the international team that contributed to this study is ultimately hoping for is to discover a blood marker that can help predict bipolar episodes, and whether treatment is working. Exciting news!

Show me some love!