Scientists Predict Who Will Respond to Lithium

Lithium is a salt which treats both mania and depression in a lucky thirty percent of people with bipolar disorder. But prior to the discovery of a new method to predict who will respond to lithium, people were playing roulette.

Now scientists at the Salk Institute can predict, with 92 percent accuracy, who will be a lithium responder. All they need is five cells and a test. They discovered that the neurons of people with bipolar disorder are more excitable when exposed to stimuli and fire more rapid electrical impulses than individuals without the disorder. This means that people with bipolar are more easily stimulated.

In an old study, the scientists found that soaking skin cells from bipolar patients in a lithium solution calmed the hyperexcitability–but only for some of them. The next study proved even more fruitful. The researchers soaked lymphocytes (immune cells) rom known lithium responders in lithium solutions, and found the same results–the hyperexcitabilty was calmed. But even though both responders and non-responders had the same excitability, the electrophysiological properties were different.

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Credit to flickr.com user The Javorac. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

The Salk team looked for electrical firing patterns in neuronal lines, measuring the threshold for evoking a reaction, and other qualities. Overall, the patterns in responders were completely different than in non-responders.

The scientists were able to replicate the results again and again, which means that this test is proven to work. Now a blood draw is all that’s needed to test whether a patient with bipolar disorder will respond to lithium.

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What to do if You Run Out of Medication

Medications. Like it or not, sufferers of mental health problems usually need to take them to manage their conditions. Being compliant with your prescribed pills is the best path to stable moods. But what happens when you run out?  Here are a few tips to deal with just that.

1. Don’t Panic

If you have a mental health issue that’s triggered by stress, panicking is the worst thing you can do for yourself. Withdrawal symptoms can be harsh, but not as bad as triggering your illness. Breathe. Remind yourself that this is a temporary problem, which can be fixed. Which brings us to our next point…

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Credit to flickr.com user mattza. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

2. Call Your Doctor

Call your doctor immediately, and keep them apprised of the situation. If you can’t meet with them, find out if they will call in a prescription for you to a pharmacy. Any doctor at your regular office should have access to your files, and should be able to fill a prescription.

3. Use a Regular Pharmacy

If you can, visit the same pharmacy and get to know your pharmacist. Bring your empty prescription bottles with you to talk to the technicians, and they might be able to give you an emergency five- or seven-day supply, or direct you to an emergency clinic that can. You are unlikely to get one if you are sixteen or younger, as pharmacists are reluctant to give out medication to minors. Take an adult that you trust with you to help smooth things over.

4. What if I Can’t Afford Them?

If you can’t afford your medications, ask your doctor. He or she may have access to free samples of the pills you need, or be able to prescribe you a cheaper generic drug. If you’re an American citizen and you’re uninsured, find out if the pharmaceutical company that manufactures your drug has a patient-assistance program. You may qualify for these programs if your income is 100% of the poverty line, but it’s unlikely that you will if you receive Medicaid benefits. Ask your pharmacy if they have a discount program if you pay in cash. If you’re over fifty and have a membership with the AARP, you can receive discounts on pills.

There is no reason for you to go into medication withdrawal. Ideally, you’d be able to have your doctor prescribe some drugs months in advance, but if that’s not the case, contact your doctors and pharmacy to find out what they can do for you. They want to work with you.

Have you ever run out of meds?

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